Friday, 16 July 2021

 Captain Sir Tom Moore

The ashes of the super-NHS fund raiser Captain Moore were interred in the family grave at Morton Cemetery, Riddlesden, Keighley. In accordance with his wishes, the words 'I told you I was Old' were inscribed on his memorial:

BBC Coverage of the event can be found HERE








Wednesday, 14 July 2021




Spectacular CWGC Special Memorial in West Yorkshire Cemetery

At Keighley's Morton Cemetery, there is a spectacular  Commonwealth War Graves Commission Special Memorial commemorating 22 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. It consists of a Portland Stone statue of a Soldier and two panels upon which are carved the names of 22 soldiers who died of Sickness or Wounds at Keighley War Hospital.




My first port of call was to look at information on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website.


Graves Registration Report

According to William J Ball, Area Inspector completed on 22 April 1922.


There are 22 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war commemorated here on panels adjoining a Special Memorial in the form of a life size Portland Stone statue of a First World War Soldier upon a decorated podium. There are an additional 6 Commonwealth burials of the 1939-1945 war, individually marked, throughout the cemetery.


In Grateful Memory of these men who served in the Great War, and died of Sickness and Wounds in the Keighley War Hospital

 Monument - figure of Soldier in uniform in Limestone (probably Bath] on GritStone Base  (about 20 feet high)

Inscription Below:

Their Name Liveth For Evermore


Category of Graves:

Graves in Special Plot (C) assigned by LocalAuthority for War Graves but not under Military Control.




There is a discrepancy here as only 21 of the 22 servicemen listed on the memorial are actually buried in front of the memorial. Gunner Christopher Brown  Royal Field Artillery who served with C Battery, 174th Brigade is buried separately towards the bottom of the cemetery. I am presuming this was because he was a local man. A CWGC headstone has been erected on the family grave. The CWGC Area Inspector records him as being buried in an isolated grave in the Civilian Cemetery, noting that he lies in a plot intended for three burials - presumably the other two places were for his parents.




I was quite interested to see that the CWGC War Grave Register had been amended following the removal of a large number of German graves were exhumed and removed to Cannock Chase's German War Cemeteries after the Second World War. What happened [I wonder] to the German MemoriaL which was designed by one of the interned German Officers? Probably broken up, I guess?



The Imperial War Museum's War Memorial Register  has made details of the memorials construction under a Creative Commons licence - ¢his information is made available under a Creative Commons BY-NC licence.

© WMR-28621


IWM War Memorial Register


The memorial was unveiled August 12, 1921 in a ceremony attended by local clergy and dignitaries and dedicated by the Bishop of Bradford.


FIGURE OF A SOLDIER IN MOURNING POSE WITH HEAD BOWED AND RIFLE REVERSED. ON SQUARE PLINTH WITH TWO FLANKING PANELS DECORATED AS BELOW. WHOLE MEMORIAL STANDS ON CRUCIFORM BASE FLANKING PANELS DECORATED WITH CARVED RELIEF DEPICTING ANGELS ON FRONT FACE AND LIONS ON REAR


1914 - 1918/ THOSE HONOURED HERE DIED IN/ THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY/ AND LIE BURIED NEAR THIS SPOT/ (NAMES)


Components

  • Plinth
  • Measurements: height 840MM, width 2070MM
  • Materials: Stone - Portland
  • Base
  • Measurements: height 920MM, width 2070MM
  • Materials: Stone - York
  • Figure
  • Measurements: Undefined
  • Materials: Stone - Portland


War Memorials Trust

VERY UNUSUAL MEMORIAL IN THAT IT APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN CONSTRUCTED AS A LOCAL INITIATIVE TO COMMEMORATE SERVICEMEN WHO DIED IN KEIGHLEY WAR HOSPITAL AND THEN SEEM TO HAVE BEEN TRANSFERRED TO THE CWGC. THIS PROBABLY EXPLAINS WHY THE NAME PANELS HAVE RECENTLY BEEN RE-CUT WHILST THE MORE DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF THE MEMORIAL ARE QUITE WEATHERED. THE RIFLE IN PARTICULAR HAS DETIORATED QUITE BADLY


Here are a selection images of the memorial:






























Monday, 23 November 2020

Two Early Casualties of WW2

The day after war began, two soldiers lost their lives on a Lancashire road. Pte Thomas Albert Lawson was a Territorial Army soldier serving in The King's Own Royal Regiment, while Pte Thomas Lee Driver was a regular soldier with The Loyal Regiment. Both were killed when their motorcycle was in collision with a motor car driven by 2nd Lt Lee Wheeler. According to a witness, the two vehicles changed sides of the road three times before the collision. Lawson [from Carnforth] was killed instantly while Driver was thrown heavily to the ground. Latter was taken to a hospital in Lancaster but died later from his injuries.

Pte Thomas Driver was buried in the churchyard at St Mark's, Dolphinholme 



Pte Lawson was buried St John's churchyard, Yealand Conyers






Friday, 27 March 2020

Lusitania Victim

Chief Steward Arthur Hugh Ford, Mercantile Marine lost on SS Lusitania. His was 58th body of 259 recovered [Queenstown]. Buried at Everton Cemetery, Liverpool. Originally named on the Mercantile Marine Memorial but name removed in 1928 when it was discovered he had a grave.


Tuesday, 24 March 2020

Killed by Mine Explosion

Walter Bentley Sharples, 5th Engineer Officer, Merchant Navy is named on the family memorial in Haslingden Cemetery, Lancashire. His name is listed on the Tower Hill Memorial. The names of the mostly Chinese crew are recorded on the Hong Kong Memorial.
MV Arinia was a British Motor Tanker of 8,024 tons built in 1936 by Lithgows, Port Glasgow for the Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Company. She was powered by a diesel, single screw giving 12 knots.
On the 19th December 1940 she was mined and sunk off the Nore Light Vessel when on route from Aruba for the Isle of Grain. It seems that the engines were switched off while the boat was in the Thames Estuary waiting for dock gates to open. Sadly, as soon as the engines were turned off, the anti magnetic system was disabled and the metal hull attracted a mine. All the crew perished with the exception of a cabin boy



Thursday, 13 February 2020

Massive explosion kills Father and Son


Samuel Wolstenholme and his son William were killed in the Kearsley Colliery explosion March 12, 1878. They are buried together at St Stephen's, Kearsal Moor:




Massive 

Wednesday, 18 December 2019

Ornate Grave Art on Peake children's gravestone

Too Sweet for Earth: John [9] and Margaret [3] - the two Peake Children are buried at Atherton Cemetery.


Welcome to the Graveyard Detective

An illustrated look at the World of Graveyards and Cemeteries. There are many Stories behind the Stones that Stand in them. Who knows what we might find?

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